Clare PPN report from the Briefing on the Urban and Rural Regeneration Funds Wed, 5th September 2018

Report on briefing session on the Urban and Rural Regeneration Funds September 2018

Clare PPN Staff member Sarah Ferrigan attended a workshop last Wednesday 5th September aimed at organisations who intend to apply for funding under either the Urban or Rural Regeneration Funds.  Read her report below and see also the attached PDFS which were provided at the session.

Background: The Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government (DHPLG) together with Department of Rural and Community Development (DRCD) held a joint regional briefing in respect of both the Urban and Rural Regeneration Funds that were launched in July as part of Project Ireland 2040.  The briefing was intended to assist and inform bodies that may be considering making a bid for funding to either or both Funds, particularly now as bids are being formulated and questions arise.

Provision is made in the National Development Plan (NDP) for €2bn to 2027 for the urban fund and €1bn to 2027 for the rural fund, to support implementation of the National Planning Framework (NPF).

PDFs from the briefing:

Project Ireland 2040 and the URDF

Urban Regeneration & Development Funds 2018

Sarah’s report:

Report on Southern Regional Assembly Meeting, 5 September, Silver Springs Cork.

4 billion over 10 years for transformational projects

  • Urban Regional Development Fund (URDF) – 2 billion
  • Rural Regional Development Fund (RRDF) – 1 billion
  • Climate action fund – €500k
  • Disruptive Technologies fund – €500k

Category 1 – No minimum bid, shovel ready for 2019, consents & planning in place. Collaboration with bodies/organisations used to government funding as reporting and auditing requirement onerous.

Category 2 – €500,000 minimum bid, pipeline projects or project development with clear potential possibly leading to Category 1 bid in following year.

Urban Regional Development Fund (URDF)

  • Urban centres with population greater than 10,000
  • Towns with population between 2,500 and 10,000
  • administered by Department of Housing, Planning & Local Government
  • 2 billion to 2027
  • Supports National Planning Framework (NPF) and National Development Plan (NDP)
  • Ideally local authority led but with partners (community/private sectors)
  • Planning must be in place or in progress by the end of January 2019
  • Category 1 and 2 can be clustered to get to 10m.
  • 75% funding with matched of 25%

Rural Regional Development Fund (RRDF)

  • Rural town with population less than 2,500
  • Towns with population between 2,500 and 10,000
  • Administered by Department of Community & Rural Development
  • 1 billion to 2027 (initial €315 million 2019-2022)
  • Supports National Planning Framework (NPF)
  • Encourages collaboration ( with regard to capacity of partners)
  • Has a social and economic impact
  • Planning permission must be in place at time of contract
  • Towns can cluster projects into one application
  • Avoid duplication but can develop an existing project only if it could not have been done in another way
  • Land valuation can be used as matched funding
  • Up to 80% funding with at least 20% matched

*NOTE: A decision has yet to be made as to whether LEADER funding can be used as matched funding

Timeline:

Closing dates:

  • RRDF 27th September
  • URDF 28th September

Followed by approvals in November and project commencement in January 2019.  Next call in mid – 2019

Q&A

High degree of competition locally?Organisations should work together to make a submission for their town and utilise each other’s expertise

Are closing dates flexible?This is a multi-year programme.   If you miss this round get ready for the next one.  They do not want to reallocate money from a project whose application was rushed and therefore unsustainable

Organisations often have no control over delays in planning/CPO’s/legal matters.  What happens if it drags on?As above it is a multi-year programme however if progress is being made by January 2019 it will be assessed.

Can applications be made for area based programmes within a city?Yes as long as it is a project that would not have occurred otherwise and must be concentrated in an area of the city that needs it the most.

What about housing? Can some projects be mixed use to include social housing?The fund is not for housing but to provide the infrastructure and amenities to be ready for new housing.

Can it be used to join up greenways?The greenway fund is separate and geographical areas need to come together to decide the viability of joining up greenways.

If an organisation has unspent money from funds awarded in 2017 can it be utilised as matched funding?It depends on who awarded the funding, what its purpose was and if you have permission.

Can land acquisition be part of expenditure?Yes

RRDF guidelines say that the project should be replicable?Great if easily replicable but not the be all and end all

Are funds already spent on a project allowed as expenditure in application?No, sunk cost are not allowed in application.

National Report on Public Participation Networks in 2016

Minister Kyne Announces publication of First PPN Annual Report

Seán Kyne, TD, Minister of State at the Department of Rural and Community Development and the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment today (20/12/1/17) announced the publication of the First Annual Report of the National Public Participation Network (PPN) Advisory Group.

The Advisory Group, which was established in early 2016 on foot of recommendations of the Working Group on Citizen Engagement with Local Government, has the job of advising and supporting the Department of Rural and Community Development in the operation and development of the PPNs.

In June of this year, each PPN was required to complete an Annual Report in respect of its activities in 2016 – their first full year of operation. The completion of the report was a joint effort by both the PPNs and the local authorities and was designed to capture specific non personal data and certain indicators relating to the activities of the PPN.

The Minister remarked that this report “was itself clear evidence to the tremendous work that has been undertaken by PPNs in such a very short space of time”.  PPNs have now been established in all local authority areas with some 12,000 organisations registered with them by the beginning of 2017 with all indications showing the PPNs continued to grow in the last twelve months.

The report contains a number of recommendations which will be considered by the National Advisory Group and reported on to the Department of Rural & Community Development.

The Minister concluded by saying that “PPNs, are the future. They are the main link through which the local authority connects with the community, voluntary, environmental and social inclusion sectors and they are uniquely placed to bring a diversity of voices and interests to the decision making process. I would encourage those organisations who have not yet signed up to their local PPN to do so as soon as possible in order to ensure that their voice is heard and that they play a role in the future development of their Public Participation Network.”

You can read the report here:  reportonppns2016

National Conference for PPN members to take place in Sligo on October 19th 2017

NATIONAL PUBLIC PARTICIPATION NETWORK CONFERENCE

THURSDAY 19th OCTOBER 2017, SLIGO

The first National PPN Conference will be held on Thursday 19th October 2017 in the Clayton Hotel, Sligo.  It is being hosted by Sligo PPN in conjunction with the Department of Rural and Community Development (DRCD).

Who should attend?

The Conference is targeted at PPN Secretariats, PPN Members, Resource Workers, Volunteers, Elected Members, Local Authority staff supporting the PPN structure, Partnership / Local Development Companies and LCDCs.

Topics

Development of PPNs; Statements of Wellbeing; Developing Policies and Models of Best Practice.  The Conference will also provide excellent opportunities for networking and reviewing the strengths, challenges, opportunities and threats encountered to date. 

Conference Programme / Speakers

The conference will focus on the progression of PPNs at local and national level, how they can influence policy, develop collaborations between PPNs and Local Government and strategising and building for the future. 

There will be input from the DRCD, breakout sessions giving voice to individual input on issues around Social, Economic, Democratic and Environmental themes and an overview of PPN Models of Best Practice. 

Inspirational guest speakers on the day will include Mr John Lonergan, Former Prison Governor and Management Expert; Mr Michael Ewing, Co-ordinator of the Environmental Pillar. 

Registration              

https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/national-public-participation-network-conference

 To encourage participation and access there is no conference fee applying  

 

Queries to Sligo PPN Office on 071 9114430; e-mail:ppn@sligococo.ie

 

Clare PPN’s Submission to the Citizen’s Assembly on Tackling Climate Change

Clare Public Participation Network Submission to the Citizen’s Assembly

on the Issue

‘How can the state make Ireland a leader at tackling climate change?’

11th August 2017

Clare Public Participation Network wishes to make the following submission for consideration by the Citizen’s Assembly:

Leadership: Clare PPN calls for strong leadership from all levels of government to ensure that every department’s actions, and every piece of legislation passed is climate proofed. Further to this we call on the government to ensure no further licences for fossil fuel exploration are granted in Ireland’s territory. Clare PPN calls for every measure that is introduced to be poverty proofed and for mitigating steps to be taken if and when steps designed to tackle climate change have a negative effect on people’s socio economic status.

Climate Positive Communities Fund:Clare PPN wishes to suggest that the national government should pilot a programme where it rewards communities and individuals who come up with ways to reduce Ireland’s carbon footprint, to generate clean energy or to move towards food sovereignty in their own communities or in the country as a whole.  Clare PPN suggests that a national organisation employing people with the expertise to evaluate the climate impact of each proposal should be set up and should have the dual role of working to remove any barriers that exist for effective community action and of determining level of financial reward that each project merits. Clare PPN notes that based on current targets the Irish state will be liable for significant financial penalties for failing to meet its climate targets and suggests that the funding spent on a national programme such as the one suggested above would have the potential, if successful to reduce our exposure to such fines and to increase participation by the public in tackling climate change.  This suggestion would ensure that Ireland could help become a leader in tackling climate change by harnessing the power, creativity, local knowledge and resourcefulness that are features of every townland and village in Ireland.

Community Participation:Clare PPN calls on the government to radically alter how public consultations are conducted. In line with the Aarhus Convention it calls on the government to adopt policies and commit resources to ensuring that communities are engaged in decision making, planning, ownership, and ongoing management of any clean energy projects that are proposed in their areas. This approach should be followed in regard to all natural resources with particular reference to seaweed harvesting which appears likely to experience increased interest from private companies given recent findings that it may contribute to lessening climate impact from cattle farming.  Clare PPN wishes to stress that communities should be engaged from the conception stage in any project such as wind, wave or solar energy. Further to this communities must be resourced and supported to consider themselves as energy producers rather than only consumers. This requires significant action to ensure that micro producers of energy are able to efficiently and effectively sell any excess energy produced to the grid and able to access energy from the national grid. It is imperative than any blocks to this process or to communities becoming sustainable energy communities are removed. Clare PPN would like to call for the removal of prohibitions on Virtual Private Networks as these restrictions prevent collaborative approaches to sustainable energy generation for small groups or clusters where this may otherwise be an option.

Infrastructure: Clare PPN is based in a rural, agricultural county, parts of which are dependent on tourism for its sustainability. Clare PPN calls for more supports for environmentally sound tourism practices, for significant investment in environmentally sustainable public transport within the county and for support for innovative, sustainable land use including forestry. Clare PPN notes the existence of successful Community Supported Agriculture projects in Clare and wishes to commend and recommend these as models which could be developed and which are worthy of support. Clare PPN also notes the existence of wetland regeneration projects in County Clare and calls for these to be supported. Clare PPN also recognises the very successful Clare Bus company and call for additional support for them in their moves to become more sustainable, particularly in the area of EV based public transport. Clare PPN calls for a national and local programme of financial and administrative support for individuals and businesses to become self-sufficient in energy needs.

Any enquiries in relation to this submission may be directed to

Christy Sinclair,

Clare PPN Environmental College Representative

Phone: 087- 2244569

Email: sarah@clareppn.ie

Website: www.clareppn.ie

Twitter: @clare_ppn

Facebook: www.facebook.com/clareppn/

Clare PPN Social Inclusion College Submission to the Review of the Rebuilding Ireland

 Submission to Rebuilding Ireland from Clare Public Participation Network:

 August 10th 2017 

Clare Public Participation Network wishes to make the following submissions to this review of Rebuilding Ireland:

  1. Clare PPN wishes in this submission to highlight and draw attention to the fact that a housing crisis exists in rural and regional areas and is not restricted to Ireland’s cities. Whilst the crisis may differ from region to region County Clare is experiencing an extreme shortage of all types of rental accommodation, an increase in homelessness, prevalent over- crowding as well as rural depopulation. There are more than 6000 houses vacant in the county and housing waiting lists stand at approximately 2500 households which when children are figured in means that more than 4,000 people are currently waiting for housing.
  2. Clare PPN calls for a renewed effort in ensuring accuracy and transparency in reporting of figures: Clare PPN notes the tendency of reports issued from the Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government to minimise the extent of the crisis and to maximise the figures in terms of improvements made. Clare PPN considers it of the utmost importance to proper budgeting and policy making that accurate inclusive figures should be maintained and published. We have noted that the following groups who all experience housing need and homelessness are frequently omitted from official figures:
  • People living in the direct provision system who have received leave to remain in Ireland but who are unable to leave direct provision because there is no available affordable or supported accommodation for them.
  • Travellers who are currently in overcrowded, roadside, or shared accommodation* due to difficulty in accessing social housing/Traveller specific accommodation and housing in the private rental sector.
  • People with disabilities who are currently sharing with families, in residential care or living in nursing homes when their choice is to live independently. In Ireland 600,000 people have some form of disability and in County Clare alone there are 217 people on the housing waiting list in this category. 
  1. On a national level, Clare PPN wishes to add its voice to that of the many other organisations who are calling for an end to the over-reliance on the private rental sector in addressing housing need in Ireland. Clare PPN notes and supports in particular the contribution to the debate made by TASC and the Nevin Institute, both of whom call for a significant change of direction in Irish housing policy and envisage a special purpose company set up by the government to build, purchase and maintain a large stock of state-owned housing which will be available on a cost rental model for long term rental to tenants of all income levels in Ireland. Even in the absence of a shift of direction in policy as described above Clare PPN wishes to stress that there is an urgent need for national and local authorities to invest in directly building or purchasing social housing for the long term secure use of those who cannot access the private rental sector or face barriers doing so. It should also be noted that figures recently released demonstrate that there are over 1200 properties vacant in Ennis where demand for social housing stands at approximately 1100 households. On this basis for sustainable town development it is clear that more emphasis must be placed on all programmes which will bring these properties back into use up to and including compulsory leasing and purchasing. Apart from the poor use of space, dereliction and urban blight which a concentration of empty properties causes in a town, the turnaround for getting such properties renovated and fit for use is in general much faster than bringing new developments from planning to completion.

 

  1. Clare PPN regards the following as essential to ensure that housing policy in Ireland in general and the Rebuilding Ireland programme specifically are effective for all groups who make up our diverse communities.
  • The need for housing lists to be divided between those with a long term housing need and those with a short term need. People who qualify for housing assistance should be able to select which list they wish to belong to.
  • There is an urgent need for a review of the effectiveness or otherwise of the Housing Assistance Payment particularly with regard to people with long term social housing needs. People identified with long term housing need should not be removed from Housing waiting lists even when they are in receipt of HAP. There is also a need for a review in each county and its urban areas as regards the availability of rental accommodation within HAP limits. In Clare, whilst there is housing for sale, there is a shortage of appropriate rental accommodation in almost all areas within the limits of the HAP scheme. This exposes people to greater risks of becoming homeless and of accepting substandard accommodation.  Whilst HAP figures can indicate that people have accommodation, they do not provide any guarantee as to the quality or suitability of that accommodation.
  • In Clare where Clare PPN is active there is no targeted scheme that addresses the difficulties that members of the Traveller Community face when accessing private rental accommodation even when they are approved for a Housing Assistance Payment. Attention to this issue is urgently needed at a national level, with there being obvious justification and need for an intervention designed through consultation with the Traveller community which obliges, finances and monitors local authorities, approved housing bodies, or private developers to provide appropriate accommodation for Travellers.
  • Local Authorities should be held to account as regards their application for and draw down of the funding available for Traveller Accommodation. Local Authorities should jointly conduct an annual Traveller needs and future needs analysis with the Travelling community in each county. The results of this needs analysis should be agreed on by all parties and the Traveller Accommodation Plan should be developed on the basis of it. A realistic budget should be adopted for Traveller accommodation nationally and for each county’s Traveller Accommodation Plan. The Travelling community should be resourced to participate fully in all decisions which concern them and all Local Authority staff who engage with Travellers should be given training on diversity and on the particular challenges that face the Traveller Community. The Trespass Act should be repealed and where members of the Travelling Community who are on the Housing waiting list are dwelling in unofficial sites and the Local Authority has no other suitable accommodation available for them then the Local Authorities should be directed to provide emergency sanitation, waste disposal services and electricity to them for a reasonable fee within the means of the families in question. Local Authorities should be resourced and directed to conduct all of the above.

 

  • Local Authorities should be required to make provision and account for the needs of people becoming homeless through situations of domestic violence. Local Authorities should be asked annually to demonstrate what steps they have taken to ensure that people in such circumstances are catered for.
  • National Government needs to make provision for people in Direct Provision who have been granted leave to remain or refugee status but cannot secure accommodation in order to enable them to leave the direct provision centres.  It should be noted that many of these people have become impoverished whilst in the asylum application process as a result of the Irish Government’s policies. Clare PPN calls for full social welfare payments to be made available immediately to every person who has been granted leave to remain. As part of its submission to this review of Rebuilding Ireland Clare PPN calls for a complete end to the system of Direct Provision as it fails to meet the housing needs of those in the asylum system. Clare PPN notes that in particular it fails to meet the basic needs of children.

 

  • Clare PPN calls for the continued and increased provision of housing for people with disabilities and the need to include people with disabilities who are currently unable to secure their own independent accommodation in all planning processes and consultations.

Any enquiries regarding this submission may be directed to:

Sarah Clancy

Public Participation Network Coordinator

Unit 1 Westgate Business Park

Kilrush Rd,

Ennis

Co Clare.

Phone: 087 1617375

Email: sarah@clareppn.ie  Website: www.clareppn.ie Twitter: @clare_ppn Facebook: www.facebook.com/clareppn/

National Consultation on a new Strategy for Public Libraries Deadline July 28th 2017

Public Library Strategy 2018-2022 Consultation With Public Participation Network

Trinity_College_Old_Library_‘Long_Room’_—_Dublin_(12890323213)

The Department of Housing Planning, Community and Local Government, in conjunction with the LGMA and the Libraries Development Committee, has commenced the development of a new 5 year strategy for the public library service in Ireland.  As part of our early consultation on developing the new strategy, we would like to invite the Public Participation Networks to give some feedback on the progress of the Strategy developed to date. This is in advance of a more detailed public consultation which will take place in the Autumn.

You can read the draft strategy here:  2017 Library Strategy Draft Outline

Recent enhancements to the library service have greatly increased its value to the community.   The public library service can be very proud of the many initiatives delivered as part of the last strategy ‘Opportunities for All’ 2013-2017which was a progressive programme for the development of our public library services.  Indeed the latest innovation launched on the 29 May 2017 is ‘Libraries Ireland’  – a  single library system  providing a single access for library members to over 15 million items in the 333 library branches across the country.  It is a landmark step in the positioning of the library as the ‘go to’ place for communities. Your views, as  Public Participation representatives are welcomed on what you consider will add to the new strategy and assist to inform its development so the public library is positioned to realise its full potential.

Background:

The term of our current public libraries strategy Opportunities for All, ends in 2017. A review of its progress and extensive early consultations has commenced to inform the development of a new strategy for the period 2018-2022.  The task is to­ identify key areas of focus for the next five-year strategy, taking account of new trends, developments and opportunities. 

Progress to date:

3 Thematic Programmes have been identified for the development and enhancement of the public library service during the period 2018-2022.

  1. Community Development,
  2. Literacy and Learning;
  3. Books/Reading & the Life of the Imagination.

Under each of these themes, a number of priority programmes will be designed and pursued, for example under Literacy and Learning, services and promotion of lifelong learning will be progressed.

Key questions:

  1. Do you feel the Thematic Programmes outlined would cover the most important services provided by libraries in your locality?
  2. If not, what others in your opinion could be explored and pursued?
  3. Is this likely to change significantly over the period 2018-2022?
  4. Do you have any other comments/suggestions on the proposed strategy?

How to Give Feedback  Deadline July 28th 2017: 

Please send your observations on the attached draft strategy outline attached here – 2017 Library Strategy Draft Outline (which consists of 3 thematic programmes and 6 underpinning elements for service delivery) to libstrategyreview@housing.gov.ie